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My Princess Episode 16 (End) synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스

My Princess Episode 16 (End) synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/

My Princess Episode 16 (End) synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스

My Princess Episode 16 (End) synopsis/summary/recap



Seol rides her bike to school two years after the vote, but then is immediately followed by her security team, running to keep up with her. When her main bodyguard catches up to her, he huffs and puffs that she still can’t manage to get her driver’s license in two years. Well, perhaps you could at least get bikes for your security team, to ride alongside you?

A crowd gathers to take photos of the princess, but this seems to be a common sighting, as Seol rides to school every day, intent on finishing grad school. It’s good to be a princess with goals.

She heads to class, where she’s met with her professor of archaeology for her final term: Yoon-ju? Aw, geez, really? Would it have killed you to take a class with Jung-woo, for our sakes? Or is he too busy being your cultural ambassador and whatnot?

Thankfully they’re still antagonistic towards each other, Yoon-ju making a point of announcing to the class that she doesn’t abide people who think they can get away with not coming to class. She smugly addresses Seol that she’ll just get another F if she thinks she’s exempt.

Seol chases Yoon-ju after class to ask if she’s going to fail her again out of personal ill will, but Yoon-ju just claims that Seol’s F last semester wasn’t due to her absences, but her performance. Seol tries to play nice because this is the last class she needs to pass before getting her degree, and even acknowledges that though she doesn’t like it, Yoon-ju is the one who knows the Hae-young Museum best.

She explains that she’d like to do a good job maintaining the museum, for its namesake. That just raises Yoon-ju’s ire, as she notes that Seol must be trying to appease her guilty conscience, since she’s chased Hae-young out of the country and made him live just like his father.

Seol disagrees—he’s choosing a life of purpose as a diplomat, and that’s admirable. So, one thing’s clear: Hae-young has spent the last two years abroad, probably in an effort to stabilize the monarchy and let Seol begin her reign without scandal, in regards to both Daehan’s money and their romantic relationship.

One of the things Seol has done as the princess is open the palace to the public, and we see groups of tourists snapping away photos, and in the main hall, they’re greeted by a cardboard cutout of Seol. HAHAHA.

As Seol gets ready in a traditional hanbok, her aides come to her with birthday phone calls from princes: one from Prince Harry, and another from Prince…Nichkhun. Ha. Her face falls, really wanting a call from a diplomat rather than a prince.

She goes in front of the cameras on a stage, in what seems to be a regular gig. She presents different parts of Korean culture, like traditional foods, and even plays a gayageum. So pretty.

The lights go out in the middle of the shoot, and the staff presents her with a birthday cake. Darn. I seriously had my hopes up for a romantic gesture by Hae-young. Too soon?

On her way out, reporters surround her, but she’s now become a pro at the press-walk-and-talk, ignoring and answering the right questions. She’s thrown by one comment asking if Hae-young has cut ties with the monarchy, and then when asked about recovering her grandfather’s lost journal (recently found abroad), she says she’s working on it.

Back at the palace, she’s greeted with a mountain of presents from her fans, and she lights up, as she asks, “Which of these do you think it is?” … “The one from Park Hae-young?”

Um…awkward…none of them are from him. She doesn’t believe it at first, thinking he’s prepared some extra special surprise then, but this time, it’s the truth. No present from Hae-young.

She stews for a while, staring at her phone, and then finally announces that she’s going to call him, “Because I’m cool!!” Hahaha. The way she shouts that is hilariously unconvincing.

She calls, totally put out by the fact that she has to call HIM on HER birthday…only he doesn’t answer. Cue princess outburst. “Is he…cheating? Aaaaargh! He’s cheating with some busty leggy blonde, I know it!” LOL.

The next day she takes her driving test again for the millionth time, and fails like always. I do love that she’s so flawed, and consistently so. She goes to visit Grandpa’s ashes, and finds that someone else has left flowers already. One guess who.

She tells Grandpa that Hae-young is abroad, and she knows he must miss his grandson; she does too. She says that he’s always away, and sometimes it even confuses her—is it for his job, or because of her?

Seol: So that’s why I’m asking. I know you always give me everything, without holding anything back, and I know it’s shameless of me to ask for more…but…couldn’t you give me Park Hae-young?

AW. I love that she’s the one asking for HIS hand. God, I LOVE that.

She gets an update from Jung-woo on her grandfather’s journal, and they vow to keep trying to get it back. Meanwhile, she goes driving again to practice, determined to beat that test.

She drives along like a little grandma, fine until somebody drives up behind her, honking. Yay! Reunion on the racetrack! She gestures at the driver to go around her (in the totally empty driving course, mind you) and she doesn’t put two and two together, so he goes around her and races to a stop up ahead.

Seol grumbles at the crazy driver to herself, ready to give him a piece of her mind…until she sees him get out of the car. It’s Hae-young, in all his shining glory, doing his best imitation of a car CF.

Her jaw drops open as she realizes that it’s him, and he just smiles at her, shaking his head. She inches closer, so slowly it nearly kills me, and manages to get so close to his car that she sandwiches him in.

I love the pairing of her little pink car and his manly black car, parked side by side when they reunite. It’s adorable, and probably a car commercial’s subliminal advertising, but I’m totally buying into it. Gah.

She’s parked so damn close that she can’t actually manage to get out of the car to meet him, and he doesn’t help matters by slamming the door in her face like a little kid. He totally neeener-neeners at her, though they’re technically both trapped.

She finally puts her window down and asks if he’s back for good, and she yells that she was worried. He says ditto—he read an article saying she failed her driving test yet another time. He reminds her that he said if she was going to drive like this, not to drive at all. Heh. Am in agreement there.

She decides she’s had enough…and leaps out of the window into his arms. So. Cute. Even Hae-young dies of cuteness, and hugs her with the biggest smile. Seol: “You can’t go anywhere anymore! Got it?”

He laughs and agrees to stay put, and they hug like a basket of kittens under a rainbow.

She makes him dinner at his apartment, and he basks in the happiness. Not one to skip over the important things, Seol asks why he didn’t send her a birthday present. Hae-young throws her the line that she taught him when they first met: “I didn’t want mine mixing in with everyone else’s.” Cheeky.

He’s impressed with her improved cooking skills, and she boasts that everyone’s calling her Lee-Jang-Geum now. She adds the not-so-subtle hint that it makes her ripe for marrying, and he just muses that someone would have to take her.

She goes to the bathroom in a huff, and he takes the opportunity to take out her birthday present—big fat diamond the size of Mars. He smiles at it, quite pleased with himself (what’s new) and gets interrupted by a phone call.

While he’s on the phone, Seol comes out of the bathroom, and sees the giant ring sitting out in front of him. Her reaction is priceless.

When she comes out, he puts it away hastily, and says he has to go meet the President. She just smiles to herself, pleased to know what’s in store. Oh, honey. Any writer will tell you—if you’ve seen the ring but he hasn’t given it to you, that means you’ve got a bout of angst up ahead before you can call it yours.

Sure enough, Hae-young goes to meet the President, who basically tells him not to marry the princess. He says that the country has barely found a way to harmoniously live with the monarchy, and Hae-young’s move to marry her will put the entire monarchy (and all those who supported it) into scandal.

Anyone else think that this would’ve made a much better conflict than the preceding fifteen episodes? That could’ve been cut short and the conflicts after establishing the monarchy would’ve been SO much more interesting. Whatevs. Too late now.

The President offers up a position in Washington, with the added push that Hae-young should pursue his ambition, rather than have his title become “the princess’ husband.” At home, he takes out the ring and weighs the big decision.

Over the phone, he tells her that he has something important to tell her, and they make plans for the day after. Seol squeals in delight knowing what the important thing is, and swoons wondering how he’ll propose.

But the following days are met with a big round of phone tag, as both their packed schedules keep pushing their date further and further. Seol’s finally had enough of the runaround, and storms over to Hae-young’s office like an angry girlfriend.

…Except she doesn’t really have the luxury of being the angry girlfriend when their relationship is so public, which he tries to get into her head, but she’s too upset to hear him. See, this is what happens when you see the ring first, and your expectations make your head go all haywire.

She lays into him for not making the time because he doesn’t want to see her, reminding him that he told her to be the princess, and basically railroads him into a breakup, just because he won’t leave his meeting RIGHT NOW. Hahaha. She very dramatically breaks up with him, but the whole thing’s hilarious because we know she’s just acting out.

He comes to the palace later to try and coax her back, but he’s met with a locked door and sounds of Seol wailing in heartbreak. Only it’s all an act, to set him straight. HA. He sighs and tries to get her to open the door, but she stands her ground, quite pleased with her own performance.

He waits it out, and tells her lady in waiting to give her the message that he’s really sorry. She says that it’s unlikely Seol will see him (since she’s coaching her to stay firm), and tells him that she must be doubly stressed because of trying to recover her grandfather’s journal.

Hae-young makes a phone call to a contact in England and gets a plan in motion to recover it, and then comes to see Seol with the news. She runs and hides under the covers, making crying noises and insisting that she doesn’t want to see him anymore.

He tells her that he’s here on official business, not as her boyfriend, and tells her that he might be able to get the journal back. She immediately throws the covers off and beams, clearly, not having cried AT ALL today. Hahaha.

She’s caught red-handed, but breezes past it in her princessy way, with a hair toss and a smile. Hae-young can’t help but just roll his eyes and smile back. He tells her that if he can recover the journal, then she has to take back the breakup. She says casually that people who break up can get back together. He muses that he’s got to make diplomatic phone calls to see his girlfriend’s face, and she just says, yeah duh—I’m a princess. Touché.

But there’s just one hiccup: the British Museum only wants to deal with Yoon-ju, since they have a long-standing relationship and they can trust her. So Seol goes to see her, putting aside her distaste to ask Yoon-ju for the favor. Yoon-ju is as icy as ever, scoffing that she must really think little of her, to assume that she’d help Seol do anything.

Seol admits truthfully that she’ll never forget what Yoon-ju said and did to her, nor will she ever forgive her, but she acknowledges Yoon-ju’s unparalleled skills career-wise. “I know that even if you hate me, you love history, just like Nam Jung-woo.”

Back at the palace, Seol tells Jung-woo that she thinks she failed, despite being pretty sure that her cool I-acknowledge-your-awesomeness approach would work. Jung-woo thinks it might have worked, and sure enough, in comes Yoon-ju.

Some time later, they get a letter announcing the return of the journal, and Seol jumps up and down in excitement, while Jung-woo smiles to himself, proud of Yoon-ju. (Grumble, grumble. Bitter grumble.)

Hae-young comes to congratulate her, and when the staff leaves them alone (throwing hearts, no less) Seol thanks “Hae-young-ee…oppa,” and plants a kiss on his cheek. He calls out to the staff that Seol is taking advantage of him, and she covers his mouth in a panic.

He teases her for being Ero-Seol and wonders what she’ll do to him if he does shut up. OH, you two. She finally just asks when he’s going to say his “very important thing,” and tired of going in circles, she just sticks her hand out and asks for the ring. Ha.

He’s taken aback, not only because he’s surprised she knows, but because he’s clearly still weighing the decision. She picks up on his hesitance, and worry starts to cloud her face. “Is it not mine? Is it for someone else?” Haha. I love this running gag of her always assuming he’s got other girls, when he’s never given any indication of being that guy. Not that I wouldn’t make the same assumption, with a boyfriend who looks like THAT. Just sayin’.

She tells him if it’s for someone else, to at least hand over the receipt…so she can get a rebate. Heh. Nice callback. He finally answers, “So what if it is?” She actually does start to worry, asking, “Did you stop liking me?!” Ha. What are you even supposed to do in the face of that kind of sincerity?

He sighs that he wished that were the case. “Then my heart would hurt less.” But before he can explain (not that he was going to, knowing him), they’re interrupted with news that her sister Dan’s been found.

Seol heads over to find her sister living in a tiny studio, with nothing to her name. She shouts that if she was going to do all that to betray her sister, she should be living it up. The shouting match turns into throwing things, and eventually they’re hitting and screaming, which is actually strangely touching, since they’re fighting like real sisters.

They get it all out of their systems, finally sitting side by side calmly. Seol tells her to come back home, and Dan says she can’t…not like this. She swears that she’ll get her life together and succeed—even more than Seol—and only then will she return. Seol: “Fine! You’d better succeed! Just you try and come back without succeeding!” Aw, it’s the only way she can show her love, and once she leaves, Dan cries.

I don’t like Dan or wish her well, but because she’s Seol’s sister, I do like her resolution. She’s family, so she can’t just be left dangling, but their resolution is both realistic and in character. Now Yoon-ju, I’d rather see scrubbing porta-potties for a day job, but Show doesn’t seem to want to do that.

Seol goes to see Mom to lie for Dan (for Mom’s benefit mostly), and tells her that Dan’s doing well, and will come see her once she’s settled into her new job. Mom asks if Hae-young is back and why he hasn’t come to the house, and when she says he’s busy, Mom just tells her wisely not to waste her youth, and to date other men.

In the same token, Seol’s right-hand-maiden makes her peace with Gunnie, content to break it off with the kid to play with men her own age, who don’t, say, spend two years circling first base, for instance.

Gunnie’s shocked at this turn from his noona, and in an outburst, cries, “YA! …I mean…noona…” Aw, he lurves her! He admits to not being a total idiot about things, and tells her that she’s of the age where if he takes things further, he’s got to be in the position to take responsibility for her (ie. marriage). So he waited. So she’d better not go anywhere! Cute. Adorably old-fashioned and totally unrealistic, Show, but cute.

Yoon-ju gets ready to leave for Egypt, and goes to see Jung-woo for one last date. He wonders what he’ll do if he wants to see her, and she tells him that he can come visit. Jung-woo: “If I do, will you greet me with a smile?” and she does, and they grin at each other like idiots. Gah, I’m annoyed that she gets Jung-woo, but the moment is kind of cute, which is also annoying.

Hae-young packs a bag, and then takes out the ring again for more pondering. He finally takes it and heads to the palace. He finds Seol out by the fountain, and tells her that he has to leave again…tomorrow.

Her face falls, and she asks where, how long. He looks at her intently, and then asks her to marry him. Right now.

Taken aback, she asks if it has to be right this second. She starts murmuring to herself about all her engagements scheduled for tomorrow, and wonders if they can’t do it later. He gets mad that she’s pushing it off, which is totally unfair when you’re the one springing ultimatums, mister, and Seol calls him out on it.

Hae-young: If you knew how much I want you right now, you can’t say that to me.
Seol: Are you the only one who wants this? What about me? For two years, I have to wonder if I’m going to even see you once a year, and then all of a sudden you want to run away, so I’m supposed quit being a princess and go with you? Why is it always what you want?
Hae-young: Even when you weren’t a princess, we were never easy.
Seol: Looks like we’re going to have to be a little more difficult.

She walks off, and he leaves the ring there, and goes.

They each mull over their choices that night, with heavy hearts. The next morning Hae-young goes to the airport, and looks around about a million times before dragging himself to the gate.

He gets on the plane and takes a glass of wine, but when he goes to drink it, a blinged-out hand stops him. It’s Seol, chastising him in her sageuk speak for not relinquishing a glass of wine to her highness.

He asks how she came, and she just says with a smile, “Because Park Hae-young wanted it. And because I wanted it.” She clasps his arm and declares that he can’t go anywhere—she’ll chase him to the ends of the earth.

She practically squeals at the thought that they’ll have thirteen straight hours of nonstop date time, and asks what he wants to do.


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My Princess Episode 15 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스

My Princess Episode 15 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/

My Princess Episode 15 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스

My Princess Episode 15 synopsis/summary/recap



After their temporary separation, Hae-young shows up at the palace, catching Seol just as she’s engaged in her victory dance over his text message.

He tells her he missed her, but she’s miffed over his two-month silence. He’s been in New York, and she asks if he’s left behind his perception — in moments like these, he’s supposed to take some kind of action. He replies that in New York, they react like this — this being a kiss on the lips, which he follows up with a few more.

Well, that’s a pretty effective way to get her back on your side. Seol is adequately appeased and jumps into his arms, and he twirls her around.

He explains that he was in New York to “take care of something,” and while that term can apply to anything, both business affairs and personal, it’s also used to refer to ending a romantic relationship (as in, tying up loose ends). Seol assumes the latter and asks how many women he had that he took so long to break up with them all, and tells him to put them in the past now.

The plant he gave her has sprouted, and the meaning behind their flowers is “Be happy.” She pouts a little that his flower message was unromantic, but he corrects her: “How can you be happy without me? It means that I’ll stick by your side every day.” She holds him to it, and wants him to make up for lost time by sticking within 50 centimeters of her, starting tomorrow. And what’s wrong with today?

Hae-young has brought back his father’s written statement that he won’t claim his legal portion of the inheritance, making Hae-young the primary heir to his grandfather’s fortune, of which he is entitled to half. The next step is to give up his portion to the monarchy…only he doesn’t intend to do that anymore. Say wut?

Hae-young meets with Yoon-ju, who is still bitter over her fate, not that she earned it or anything, of course, according to the story in her mind. She’d been given a job after being fired from the museum, but quit on her first day.

He tells her that his father was happy to see him, but also that he’d asked after Yoon-ju — a reference to the fact that she’d contacted him trying to thwart the monarchy. Even here she has been outmaneuvered, because his father has decided not to return to Korea. He’d rather accept his father’s punishment than to circumvent it (as Yoon-ju offered).

Hae-young adds that he’s not going to see her anymore, either. She calls him “extremely cruel, sometimes,” which is like the pot calling the kettle a little bit dirty.

Yoon-ju meets her father for lunch, only to find herself ambushed by a blind date. She sits uncomfortably while the man chats with her about her work, though that gets cut short by the appearance of Jung-woo (arrrgh), here to rescue her from this embarrassing date. He pulls her out of the restaurant, and says he missed her (double arrrrgh). She tells him stiffly that she’s the woman who dumped him, then got dumped by her fiancé, but he still wants to start over with her. (ARRRRRRGHHHHHHHHHH.)

She tells him he’s crazy (for once, no disagreement here), but he just smiles and says she’s at her coolest when she’s with him.

Seol meets with Secretary Oh to offer him the job Yoon-ju just vacated, to his great shock. He protests that his daughter’s misconduct got her fired, but Seol says that he served the chairman his whole life and will be of great help to her.

The news breaks that Hae-young’s father has given up his claim to the chairman’s inheritance, and now all eyes turn to Hae-young, speculating over whether he will keep it for himself or turn it over. Seol overhears the court ladies gossiping, and is alarmed by the story.

This means Hae-young is now courted by the opposition assemblyman, who is thrilled at the development. Considering Hae-young’s past comments about blocking the princess’ progress, he assumes Hae-young will be on his side now and urges him to trust in him.

Jung-woo makes the opposing assumption, that Hae-young will naturally turn over the wealth, and asks what he’s going to do to quell the speculation. Hae-young replies that he’s human, that the decision isn’t an easy one, and that he’s currently thinking it over. He adds, “Why are people more interested in other people’s inheritances than their own?” Touché.

But then he assures Jung-woo that he has no intention of keeping the money — this is his strategy to get the citizenry worked up. The knowledge that they’re taking money away from a chaebol will stir them to vote — much more than, say, if he eagerly handed it over without a fight. “All things need villains.” Ooh, crafty. Jung-woo is rather impressed and laughs to himself.

He works this angle in the interview he gives to a reporter, who asks if he’s thinking to support or oppose the restoration vote. He gives noncommittal answers (“Perhaps” and “I suppose you could say so”) designed to make it look like he’s diminishing the importance of the vote, casually saying that he doesn’t suppose the vote will amount to much. At the key question of whether he’d hand over his inheritance were the restoration plans cancelled, he asks, “Would you hand it over easily?”

The reporter is even hesitant to publish the story, acknowledging that it may cause public scorn for Hae-young. But Hae-young encourages him to publish whatever he feels is right, as it doesn’t matter to him.

Seol, unaware of his master plan, reads the articles to great dismay. Jung-woo isn’t about to blab, so he takes in Seol’s reaction with amusement, particularly when she orders Hae-young’s bodyguard/aide to put him on the no-fly list, given his odd behavior of late. The aide mumbles that he’s not authorized to do that so she orders him to keep tabs on him, report back about his doings, and even tape him.

When she confronts Hae-young, he enjoys teasing her, saying that she’d better start sucking up to him now, since he’s vacillating on the inheritance issue.

She can’t believe his inexplicable change of heart, not amused at his suggestion that they take his riches and live abroad together. He tells her it’s in her best interest to keep him happy — and then tells her to start by wearing that scandalously short skirt she’d threatened him with in a previous text message. Hee.

Then he takes issue with the way she addresses him (“Park Hae-young-sshi”) and she retorts, “What should I call you, then, Hae-young-ah?” He angles for an oppa, which she refuses. So he feigns being annoyed and stalks out in a huff, so Seol chases after him and concedes, “Fine, I’ll do it. Oppa — happy?” He pretends he didn’t hear, so she yells it in his ear.

He grabs her phone to reprogram her Mr. P label to “our oppa,” which he erases for “our honey,” and then finally: “Warm and youthful Hae-young oppa.” (The “warm and youthful” part refers to her description of her other oppa — Joo Sang-wook’s cameo — in a prior episode.)

He looks so proud of himself, it’s hilarious. She grumbles that it’s so smarmy, and again he feigns feeling insulted, sending Seol after him apologizing. That settled, he instructs her that until he signs the papers, he wants her to wink at him every time they meet eyes. Puahaha. Seol obliges reluctantly, only she’s unable to wink with one eye, so she blinks at him instead. So cute.

She calls him stingy and childish for withholding his inheritance to order her around, and he agrees that it is, “But it’s so fun.”

She finally gets him back a little by telling him that she’s had numerous offers for marriage blind dates, and goes off to prepare for one. Two can play this game, Mister P.

Seol introduces Secretary Oh to the staff as the new boss, and announces her intention to remain in this position even if the vote doesn’t go through. She’s dedicated to her role, though the problem then becomes their lack of funding. So she asks her staff to look into ways of maintaining a foundation without money, and offers to ride her current popularity into landing CFs for princess-related wares.

Hae-young video-calls her, trying to contain his worry that she’s actually out on a date like she threatened. She hangs up on him, and he calls back to instruct her to meet him. The meeting place turns out to be a car dealership, where he grills her on her date and prods for details — what does the guy do for a living? Did she smile at him? Look into his eyes? Seol tells him that she’s thinking of going out on another date with the guy.

He’s here to buy a car, her and their promised driving lessons. Only, the lesson goes about as well as you might expect, which totally takes me back to those teenage years when I thought I’d never be able to drive without fear. She’s plastered to the wheel like an old lady, going all of 20 kmh (which she calls speedy), while Hae-young beats his chest in frustration at her inability to drive straight.

Finally he orders her out and calls her a dummy in frustration, which especially peeves her and makes her retort that maybe he didn’t consider that the car was the problem, or his awful teaching. He contritely takes back the “dummy” and offers to accept his punishment — and leans in for a kiss.

Seol hardly thinks that’s a suitable punishment, so he says he’ll “take that back” — and leans in to “rescind” his kiss (with another one). Ha! That’s pretty smooth, actually. *Files away for future use.*

Hae-young then goes to the president to ask for his help, and though the latter is surprised, he agrees to let the vote decide the monarchy’s fate. He comments on Hae-young’s “foolishness and courage” at putting up his enormous inheritance, which makes him wish he were on his side. In fact, the president makes the offer for Hae-young to come work for him in the Blue House.

The days go by and two days before the vote, Seol gives an interview with Reporter Yoon. Asked what she’d like to do first if the vote passes, she answers that she’d like “somebody’s” congratulations, skillfully evading his prodding for a name.

Afterward, she’s ushered into the conference room, where Hae-young signs the papers giving up his inheritance to the monarchy. It’s not until afterward that Seol clues into his motivation, as he asks Jung-woo not to make this public until after the vote, because if it were to become news now, people would not be motivated to cast their ballots.

She thanks him, and he says there’s nothing to thank — the money was never his to begin with, and he’d just been greedy for it before. To assure her that he’ll be fine, he reminds her that his diplomat’s pay is pretty good, and he’s got property in his name, “So don’t go running away saying I’m poor now.”

He asks for a prize to reward his nice gesture, and they go out walking the streets together. Seol comments that it’s a pretty weak request — an ordinary streetside date — and he quips, “And what sweeter prize were you thinking to give me, Your Highness Ero-Seol?” HAHA. If only we could see inside her mind…

She asks if he’ll still stick with her if the vote fails, and he teases, “Nope. That princess of Monaco’s really pretty.” Put out, Seol suggests he sets his sights on Princess Fiona instead, green skin and all, who is at least pretty by day. He says he’d rather have Seol, then, since she’s pretty at night too.

Seol corrects him: She’s even prettier at night. He retorts that she’s prettiest when she’s not talking, and Seol tags along after him like a muppet, chirping, “Talk. Talk talk talk talk talk talk talk…” So cute.

They walk along, eating street food, browsing the stands, and playing games. They have to make a break for it when a few bystanders recognize Seol and chase them, clamoring for photos, and manage to escape safely.

However, news footage on a large outdoor screen catches their eye, with the caption indicating that one last scandal has broken out about Seol. This one was spurred by her evasive comments at her recent interview, and has dredged up old footage of Hae-young and Seol together, linking them romantically. The reporter has taken her rather innocent comments and twisted it into a Big Story, on the eve of the vote.

Hae-young’s plan is to use a televised denial of the rumors to do some damage control, but Jung-woo warns that that could have unforeseen detrimental effects. Seol says that she’ll take care of it herself, and films a video message.

Seol: “Hello, citizens, this is Lee Seol. You must have been surprised at the news. To start with the conclusion, I love Park Hae-young. Regarding the doubt about the monarchy, there will be people who believe me and those who do not. However, the truth that does not change is that I love Park Hae-young.”

The video is released, and voting day comes. Some mock it, like the assemblyman and the president, who pose for the cameras as they cast their votes and scoff at her love declaration. An indifferent Yoon-ju sits at home, while her father tells her that he trusts she will make it out to the polls.

At the palace, everyone gathers to watch the news report once the counting begins. Seol sits worriedly, so Hae-young pries her away from the TV and takes to her room, where he leads her in breathing exercises to relax. She catches him sneaking a look at the news on his phone, and eagerly asks for the restuls. With a grim face, he tells her, “It’s over.”

Before she can press him on what that means, Jung-woo enters with the staff on his heels, facing her with an equally solemn face, and tells her to confirm the truth for herself by watching the broadcast. It’s clearly not good news.

We fade out, and then we come back…

TWO YEARS LATER...

At a school campus, Seol rides by on her bike, dressed like a normal girl, and mobbed by a group of excited students.


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My Princess Episode 14 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스 / My Princess


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/

My Princess Episode 14 synopsis/summary/recap



They kiss, and Hae-young tells her that they can’t run away from each other now: “I couldn’t possibly know how hard it is for you, how you’re feeling right now. But that’s how I can keep you by my side.”

He asks if his room is empty, the Royal Grand Executive Presidential Suite, and tells her to go ahead and up-charge him for the hot water, since he’ll be staying. She protests, but he says he’s coming down with a cold since she made him wait outside all day in the freezing cold.

She calls him out on faking it just to stay, and he makes her feel his forehead and puts on his best poor puppy face. He insists he’s really really cold, and tells her to turn up the heat…”Or if you’re going to stay with me all night, a cold room’s fine.” Rawr.

That earns him a glare and a huffy exit from the princess. He laughs, quite pleased with himself.

Yoon-ju gets called to a meeting in the palace, and she finds herself entering quite the official board meeting…that she knew nothing about. Jung-woo tells her to sit down, and then speaks for the group, announcing their position on the fake royal doohickey incident: They believe Yoon-ju should take responsibility, as in resign.

Afterwards Yoon-ju speaks to Jung-woo alone, trembling in anger at how he “could do this to her” like he’s the bad guy here. She asks if he’s doing this for Seol, or the monarchy, or that goddamned history he loves so much.

He tells her that he can do more than just make her resign if he needs to, and responds that its “because of a woman that I once loved to death.” Aw, sad. I don’t think that girl exists anymore, buddy. He tells her that he’s emptying everything she has, so that she can start over. Which would maybe be a better sentiment if she had a soul or something.

Back at the pension, Seol eats while Hae-young just stares at her. She reminds him that he was dying of hunger just a few minutes ago, but he refuses to eat, wanting desperately to get sick. Ha.

He muses that if he falls really ill, then she’ll stay up all night with him, tending to his fever, and momentarily forgetting all of her pain. He tells her that he wants to get so sick that she can’t help but stay by his side, despite all the reasons why they can’t be together.

She tells him that Mom will be back soon, but he’s got that covered—she’s not returning for the night, and also, she’d be on his side anyway. “Your mom loves Park suh-bang.”

Seol looks up at him and says, “I like him too. I like Park Hae-young a lot, and I missed him too.” But she adds that she needs time before she can come to grips with their families’ past, and come to laugh about it. Right now what she needs is someone to be mad at…and the only one around is Hae-young.

Well that’s a silly argument if I’ve ever heard one. Either you’re mad at him or you’re not. Anger is not transferred from one party—his father—to the son, like inheritance or debt. This is inorganic conflict in action: Drama needs them to stay apart, so she’s gonna be mad at him. He’s like the anger patsy.

He tells her to be mad at him as much as she wants, so long as she doesn’t push him away too far. He says to watch him be happy because of her, and be as mad as she wants, because he wants to do at least that much for her. Heh. He means it sincerely, but it reads like a challenge, ’cause how long could she possibly endure if he’s going to be all lovey dovey?

They’re interrupted by a man at the door—it’s Hae-young’s replacement at the palace, here to bring the princess back. His presence immediately spikes Hae-young’s competitive streak, and after Seol refuses to return to the palace, he cuts the guy down to size. He sends a message to the President not to mess with the monarchy anymore.

Upstairs, Hae-young triumphantly tells her this is why she needs a man in the house, and reports the guy gone. Seol: “Well if that guy’s gone, maybe this guy can go too.” (They use the word nom which technically means “guy,” but connotes something more like “ass.”)

Hae-young: “What? Nom? You know, you sometimes call me nom every once in a while…” as he shuffles his feet. Hahaha. I love Wounded Pride Hae-young.

He refuses to leave, since there’s more people bound to show up. Just then, the doorbell rings, and Seol’s friends from school show up, invited by Hae-young. Next Gunnie and her court lady enter, followed by the bodyguard/minion who apparently switched sides from Gramps to Hae-young.

Seol lights up, jumping around like a little girl at the sight of her friends, and smiles at Hae-young when she realizes that he did all this for her. The doorbell rings again, and Hae-young wonders who it might be since this is everyone he invited…

And he walks back in with heavy steps, followed by a smiling Jung-woo. Yay! He joins the party, despite Hae-young’s grumbling that he wasn’t even invited.

They toast and have a good time, and Hae-young goes to the kitchen to replenish snacks, dragging Jung-woo along with him. Probably discontent to leave him alone with Seol for even a second.

In the kitchen, Hae-young watches Seol having a good time with affection, and makes a point of calling her “Our Seol,” a Koreanism that really means “My Seol.” Jung-woo notes it not without the trademark exasperation that accompanies all things Hae-young, but he’s not here to fight over Seol, much to my sadness.

He says that they look good together and he’s jealous—not so much of him, but of their situation. He then tells Hae-young about firing Yoon-ju, and asks him to help him out and go easy on her. Hae-young says he can’t do that, and that he’d only cause her more pain anyway.

There’s some fighting over Gunnie’s attention, and Seol’s friend cries out for Mr. P to bring more beer. He deflects the serving duties to Mr. N, and Jung-woo says that they should go with whoever has more money. Hae-young counters with age, and Jung-woo is finally reduced to rock-paper-scissors. Ha.

Gunnie rifles through Hae-young’s cell phone and finds a video labeled “Ero-Seol,” and both Hae-young and Seol jump at the mention of his nickname for her. Hae-young jumps up to pry it out of his hands, but everyone holds them back as Gunnie connects it to the tv for everyone to watch.

It’s the practice video of Seol doing test runs before the press conference, and everyone squeals that he’s carrying that around in his phone, while he and Seol just die of embarrassment. So cute.

Jung-woo scoffs that it’s not racy at all, despite the moniker, and then muses that this might BE racy…to Hae-young. Cue a big Woooooooooo~~ from the crowd, and Hae-young pretty much admits defeat with a “but she’s pretty in it, right?”

Seol wakes up the next morning to the comforting smell of Gunnie’s cooking, but her face falls when Jung-woo tells her that Hae-young left early in the morning. So much for wanting to be mad at him, yeah?

But then everyone gets up and scurries to the tv in a hurry, and Seol joins them to find Hae-young giving a press conference. Oy, this show and the deus ex press conference.

Hae-young basically outs his family’s backstory in relation to the monarchy—specifically how his grandfather’s fortune was built on what was once the royal treasury, and how he’s felt guilty about it all these years, hence Grandpa’s grand gesture of giving all his wealth to the restoration.

He tells them all about how the three generations of his family have caused the monarchy strife, and adds a plea for the public to take care of the princess. It all amounts to a giant public apology, for the sins of his family.

Seol watches all of this as Jung-woo drives her back to the city, and she mutters with tears in her eyes that Hae-young must be crazy. Jung-woo says that it’s probably the best that he could possibly do for her.

She finds him outside his grandfather’s hospital room, bracing for impact. She looks up at him with tears brimming in her eyes, asking why he’d do such a thing. He tells her that it was the best he could think of, and he didn’t tell her because she would’ve stopped him.

Seol: “How could you do that? I can’t do anything for you. What am I supposed to do now?” How ’bout love him freely? No? Still need more dramatic tension? Okay then.

Hae-young goes in to see his grandfather, preparing for an onslaught of epic proportions. But he’s startled to find Grandpa smiling back at him, countering his apology with a stamp of approval for telling the truth…which is something he couldn’t ever bring himself to do.

He thanks Hae-young for letting him finally lay his burdens down, and adds an apology of his own, for being the one to cause Lee Ahn’s death, and for causing such a rift with Hae-young’s father. He tells him not to hate his father because of the things that Grandpa has done.

Outside, Seol waits anxiously, as Yoon-ju walks up, full of self-righteous indignation. She blames Seol for driving Hae-young to this point. She lays into her for being so selfish, adding that she’s not the only one who’s suffered—Hae-young may appear to have grown up with a silver spoon, but he had a lonely and difficult life.

Yoon-ju accuses her of planning all of this from the beginning, which just cracks me up. A) She’s not you. B) Seol, she’s sweet, but she’s no mastermind. Basic reasoning is a strain on her.

Yoon-ju railroads her with a guilt trip about making Hae-young confess these things himself, and finishes off with how everything that’s happened is Seol’s fault. Oh, so you’re the one who hatched an evil plan wherein your goal was to make Gramps fall into a coma, but it’s all Seol’s fault? Oh. Got it. I was confused, but I see now how it’s not your fault at all.

Grandpa thanks Hae-young, and tells him that he trusts him completely. He asks him to take care of the princess, and with his burden finally lifted, he closes his eyes…and passes away.

Everyone rushes in as Hae-young cries for Grandpa to wake up, and even Yoon-ju Bot cries. Seol stands back, no doubt crippled by the guilt trip that Yoon-ju just laid on her, and cries.

As Hae-young spreads his grandfather’s ashes, he tearfully asks for forgiveness. Everyone but Seol leaves, and Yoon-ju looks back at them standing there. She makes a call to Hae-young’s father, and tells him that she’ll find a way to get him back in the country, and not to worry—Hae-young will be happy to see him. Are you literally scheming over Grandpa’s ashes? My god, woman.

Yoon-ju goes to try and lift the ban on Hae-young’s father, only to be caught red-handed by Hae-young. He tells her not to do anything, even if it’s for him, and if it’s for her…well then that’s a delusion. Ha. Awesome.

Jung-woo comes to see Seol with an “I’m just here to see you,” and laughs that her reaction isn’t what it used to be. He hands over the real royal satchel, because nothing says royalty like embroidery. He tells her that he promised the chairman that he’d put it back in the real princess’ hands, and asks her to return to the palace, because whether or not she’s there, she’s the princess.

She goes to meet Hae-young, who tells her vaguely that he’s got something he has to take care of, so he’ll be out of touch for a while. He presents her with a flowerpot, and says that it’s supposed to grow into flowers. She asks what kind but he doesn’t know. “Grow them, and I’ll be back, and you can tell me what kind of flowers I gave you.” She jokes that it sure is a weird present, but is touched at the sentiment.

He makes one request: that she return to the palace. No matter which way he looks at it, he thinks that’s where she belongs. He starts looking into the whole inheritance matter, and his lawyer tells him that his father, the rightful heir, must relinquish his claim before Grandpa’s money goes to the monarchy.

Seol ponders what to do as she puts the following comment online:

Seol: I’m growing a plant, without knowing what kind of flowers will bloom. He’s given me frustration and excitement all at once. Does Mr. P know?

Gotta love a princess who spills her heart online. She goes to visit Grandpa’s ashes, and apologizes for always blaming him, and never thanking him for helping her find her family. She promises not to run away anymore, and then re-enters the palace.

Her first order of business is to search out Yoon-ju. Showdown time? Aw, yeah. She finds her back at her old job in the museum, and calls her by her title for one last time…and then starts calling her by name, asserting her authority.

Seol reminds her of her words when she was leaving that palace: that when she returned, Yoon-ju would be dead. Ha. She follows through with her promise, the first of which is to fire her from this job too. Awesome.

Yoon-ju throws a hissy fit that this museum was put under her care directly by the chairman, but Seol gives her a wake up call. “That may have been the case yesterday, but today things have changed. The Hae-young Museum is now under the purview of the palace, and I choose the staff. So get out of my palace.” Kick. Ass.

Yoon-ju complains to her father that the museum was her entire life and she deserves it, wah, wah, wah. Even her dad is sick of hearing her entitled rants, and tells her that she’s been given a cut of the inheritance and a position at Daehan Construction. So, you’re getting a new position handed to you, and you’re still complaining? Gah.

Seol takes to her princess duties with zest, and starts strategizing for the best ways to spread Korean culture. Imma go with…dramas. She keeps getting no answer when she calls Hae-young, and when she asks her bodyguard, he tells her that Hae-young left the country. She flips her lid that they should’ve put him on the no-fly list (What is with this show and the no-fly list?) and pouts at his prolonged absence.

She begins her lessons with Hae-young’s replacement, and when he presents her with her new study schedule, she decides she doesn’t like it. She writes up one of her own, which includes: “History: Nam Jung-woo. Economics: Steve Jobs. English: John Park. Music: Beast, Rain. Fashion: Shinee. Horseback Riding: Bidam.”

LOL. This girl cracks me up. Her teacher stares slack-jawed, and she tells him that she trusts in his capabilities, and asks him to round ‘em up in a week. Hahaha.

As time passes and the flowers grow, Seol studies hard. In voiceover we hear the texts that she sends him, asking why he’s taking so long. “What are you taking care of? Are you cleaning up after all the women in your life? Are there that many? Don’t just take care of one a day. Go breakfast, lunch, and dinner.” Heh.

Another one: “Today I’m wearing a really short skirt! If you don’t hurry back, I’m gonna wear a low-cut dress!” And: “Did you find somebody else? Is it a foreign princess? Is she prettier than me? But isn’t it possible that I’m prettier?!”

She finally sends a text insisting that she’s going to be cool about it, but then follows up with a request that he just reply ONCE, with a period, just so that she knows he’s there. She gets impatient, but then one day he replies, with just one period.

She leaps up for joy, jumping up and down with so much excitement that she slips off the fountain…

And who’s there to catch her, but her knight in shining designer suit?

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My Princess Episode 13 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스 / My Princess


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/


My Princess Episode 13 synopsis/summary/recap

Hae-young and Seol arrive at his family’s vacation house, where Seol has a flashback of seeing a man (his father) at the door. Hae-young explains that this is “a place with lots of memories.” Oh, I’ll bet you don’t even know the half of it.

Seol takes a look around, settling at the piano to tap out a few notes. She opens Hae-young’s old piano books and finds stickers of Disney princesses, har har. Hm, I think you should let Dream High handle the meta jokes.

Hae-young reminds her of their deal: While they’re in this house, she’s only allowed to think of him and listen to him.

They spend a cozy night in by the fire (with some bickering thrown in, naturally), and Seol falls asleep in his arms. He sets her down to sleep (on the wood floor? For the princess?) and traces the lines in her face. She wakes groggily and wants to stay awake with him, but he tells her to go back to sleep, adding to himself, “If I see your eyes today, I don’t think I could sleep.”

In the morning, Hae-young insists on tending to Seol, from wiping her face with a towel to tying her hair for her (using her hairtie in the wrong way, I might add, which kinda makes it cuter).

This triggers another memory of her “father’s friend” — the man she recalled seeing at this house — and it’s a good sign that her lost memories are starting to return to her.

Seol steps outside to take a call from one of the people on her call list, who turns out to be Park Tae-joon, Hae-young’s father, requesting a meeting with her. Aw, how much is it gonna hurt when Hae-young realizes his dad ignored his calls, but returned one to his girlfriend?

Since Park Tae-joon is barred from entering the country, he asks Seol to speak to Chairman Park about lifting the ban, since she’s the only person who can sway him. Seol just wants to know if he had anything to do with her father’s death, and he answers no, that it was a mere accident, and that’s why he took her in after her father died. But he declines to elaborate, saying he’ll tell her the rest in person.

He hangs up on her, and when Seol turns back to the house, a few more memories trickle back, like how he had brought her here as a child (with her imperial sachet in hand) and told her that her father was dead.

Jung-woo tells the chairman that the pouch/sachet/reticule/oh-who-cares-it’s-just-a-plot-point that Dan produced is NOT, in fact, genuine. He had anticipated that it would be used to mess with the restoration, and lied to throw Yoon-ju off…which is weirdly convoluted but partly awesome just because I enjoy whenever Yoon-ju is thwarted. He has the real one in his possession.

Jung-woo asks to be entrusted in the handling of this situation — he’ll clear out the troublemaker and bring Seol back to the palace.

Hae-young finds the house empty; Seol, after calling Secretary Oh, has left the house. He calls her, and she informs him that she’s abandoned him, and that it turns out all the stuff her sister had said about their fathers is true.

He reminds her that they’d decided to go after the truth together, but she replies that she can’t see him anymore, as it makes her feel too sorry to her father. She hangs up on him, ignoring his pleas to tell her where she is, and is picked up soon afterward on the road by Secretary Oh.

Jung-woo tells Yoon-ju that he has just come from meeting with the chairman, and that he’d swapped out the imperial sachet with a fake. Yoon-ju contains her reaction and says that she won’t fall for his lie, and that he’s not that kind of guy, and that he’d always been understanding of her. He replies that he’s reached his limit with that, and that she’s free to have the sachet examined.

He tells her to step down from her position, and in return he’ll keep quiet about her using Dan to attack the monarchy. That’s the only way he can help her, and he won’t wait long for her decision.

Seol meets with the chairman and asks if Park Tae-joon killed her father, because she was taken to his vacation house on the day her father died. How would that have happened if he had nothing to do with it?

The chairman swears that his son didn’t kill him — not literally. He has come to consider it the same thing, since Park Tae-joon chased Dad around and threatened him, but the death was an accident. Seol answers that this means the chairman killed her father, and he agrees readily, bowing his head in regret.

Seol says that the chairman’s plan for restoring the monarchy has sacrificed the lives of her father, Hae-young’s father, Hae-young himself, and Dan. And now he expects her to play the princess for the very people who were responsible for her father’s death? The chairman protests, saying that the restoration is 500 years in the making, a part of history. He describes this work as his fate, insisting that it’s not for personal reasons, but Seol asserts that it seems to her that he’s really acting out of a guilty conscience. She won’t be a pawn in his Wipe My Slate Clean project, and asks him to give up the restoration.

Secretary Oh and Yoon-ju enter as the chairman begs Seol not to go, kneeling before her…and then he collapses.

The president gets word of the chairman’s condition and immediately leaps into strategy mode: The moment Chairman Park dies, quarrels will break out over his money, which was to be relinquished to the monarchy. He wants to bring Seol under his purview by making her the Blue House representative. He is firm in his belief that Seol is the real princess, but even if she weren’t, from a political standpoint it’s to his benefit to insist she is anyway.

The opposition politician happens to “coincidentally” run into the president, and sidles up to smugly comment on Chairman Park’s collapse, since his death clears the way for both of them, politically.

Hae-young arrives at the hospital to see the chairman, drawing short to see Seol standing with Yoon-ju. The latter he ignores, and he warns Seol not to go anywhere while he checks on his grandfather.

Yoon-ju snidely congratulates Seol for her ability to send the chairman into collapse and figures she must be scared, since this puts her princess standing in jeopardy. Seol can’t believe Yoon-ju’s cold-heartedness, and calls her a bitch, almost in wonder at how apt that word is. ‘Cause she’s much nicer than me, considering I’ve been using that word since Day 1.

Secretary Oh tells Hae-young that he thinks Seol has found out more information, based on the chairman begging for her forgiveness. He makes the educated guess that the list of callers responding to the ad about Lee Han included Hae-young’s father.

Combined with the fact that Seol had asked for the list a few days ago, ahh, well now things start to make sense for Hae-young. He realizes that she knows everything now.

Jung-woo arrives at the hospital, and Yoon-ju takes him aside to ask for the sachet back. Buoyed by her “miracle” (the chairman’s ill health), she has gained extra time and has no intention of stepping aside, per Jung-woo’s warning. She tells him to step aside himself, but likewise, he isn’t going to quit now.

She tells him not to do this, because if he does, “I have nobody to lean on anymore.” Oh really, evil bitch-bot? That’s your argument? If you don’t help me wreak havoc, then I won’t have anyone to support me while I wreak havoc! Boo frickin’ hoo.

Jung-woo agrees with me, although perhaps not in so many words, and tells her that he’s regretting having sided with her previously and letting things get to this point.

Yoon-ju calls Dan out to tell her that her part is over. For an evil accomplice, Dan sure is whiny, which Yoon-ju points out when Dan complains of being bored in her hotel room and annoyed that she can’t answer her mother’s calls. Yoon-ju smirks as she enlightens Dan on the part of this scheme that Dan was either too naive or foolish to realize: That gaining something means losing something, and that she’ll never have her life back. She’s being given a large sum of money to flee the country for good, and she’s free to do so now.

Dan asks suspiciously how she knows it’s safe to go — what if Yoon-ju backstabs her the moment she’s gone, blaming this all on her? Yoon-ju’s amused, because that’s exactly what she’s going to do, and for a smartie, Dan sure took a while to come to that realization. Dan counters that she’ll stick around and tell everyone that Yoon-ju put her up to it, but Yoon-ju doesn’t care, and will proceed with her plan anyway.

Hae-young finds Seol outside, and guesses that she’d talked to his father today. He tells her that no matter what she remembers, no matter what the truth is — even if that means he can’t be with her — he’s always on her side.

Seol says that the chairman had told her that Hae-young’s father didn’t kill her father: “If you’re on my side, then help me to not be the princess.” But she doesn’t mean this out of a generous spirit, but rather as a way to keep the Park men from ever being able to relieve their consciences of her father’s death. “Whether it’s causing his death, or threatening and frightening him and causing him to wander all his life — it’s all the same to me. Because in the end, my father died.”

And really, what can he say to that? In her frame of mind, pretty much the only way to make things right is to bring her father back. Being neither God nor vampire, he’s SOL on that one.

Yoon-ju watches while her father tends to the chairman, her fury growing as her eyes fixate on the loose button on her father’s sleeve. The chairman stirs, and her father rushes out to get the doctor, leaving her alone in the room. Now, I hardly believe Yoon-ju so far gone as to kill, but this hardly seems the smartest idea, amirite…?

Yoon-ju approaches his bedside as the chairman mumbles for the princess. She tells him that Seol left, and forces herself to say that she’s happy that he woke up. And lookit, there’s no bolt of lightning to smite her on the spot or anything. Must be her lucky day.

Jung-woo finds Seol as she’s leaving, and tells her the good news about the chairman waking up, to her relief. She tells him that she’s had a memory of the sachet — not enough to serve as proof, but enough to confirm that it was hers, and that she had it before living at the orphanage.

Jung-woo asks what she’d like done about Dan. While Seol is still peeved and would love to stick it to her sister, ultimately she’s sighs that she’s still family. Backstabbing, petulant, deceitful family.

Seol returns to her mother’s house for a happy reunion, although Mom gets a little shifty when Seol asks after her sister. It’s a touchy subject, so Mom hedges and says that Dan left the house for a few days because she felt bad about “the mistaken news report” and is getting some time to herself.

Mom’s on her way out to meet somebody, she says a little nervously. Seol sees that Mom has prepared a bag of clothing — obviously for Dan — and plays it off, telling her cheerily to go.

Mom chides Dan for setting off this scandal, and asks what her motivation could possibly be. Dan says she’s merely interested in the truth, since there’s a possibility that she could be the princess, but Mom’s not buying that excuse for a second. After all, she knows that Dan is in contact with her biological parents, so clearly she has no claim to royalty.

Mom sighs that Dan wasn’t this kind of person, that she was always so proud of her. Dan says yes, she was, the opposite of trouble-causing Seol — and that’s why she’s got such a bug up her butt. “You know what was the most horrible part of everything? That you loved us both equally.”

Oh, GOOD LORD. First you’re gonna whine that Mommy loved Seol more, and now you’re going to complain that despite equal affection, you deserved more of that love? You might want to check your math on that. Well, I suppose a girl who has no idea how to love would have a few misguided notions about the principle.

Dan tells her mother that just as she could never earn more love than Seol through her actions, Mom can’t love her less because of this. GEEZ. Are you sure you’re not the real princess? You sure have the complex.

Mom assures Dan that she loves her and apologizes, but urges her to stop, because this is taking things too far.

Yoon-ju is shaken from the chairman’s recovery, and tells Jung-woo that the hoped-for miracle didn’t occur after all. Are we really going to turn this whole wishing-for-death scenario into an argument to feel sorry for you, Evil Bot? What’s with the skewed self-pity today, ladies?

Jung-woo tells her firmly that such a thing is hardly a miracle, and she wonders, “Is that so?” Yes it is, Yoon-ju, who understands not the meaning of words. It makes sense you’d pair up with Dan, who understands not the workings of math.

Before Yoon-ju is ready to give Jung-woo her answer, she has somewhere to take him. Let’s just hope it’s not a dark pit with a shovel.

She asks him to help her pick out an outfit, though it’s not for her. She describes something for a man with broad shoulders — “Shoulders that will be feeling heavy, because of me.” Something lightweight for the burdened shoulders of her father.

She orders it for delivery, because going in person will just make him thank her, and she doesn’t want her father feeling indebted to anyone. Jung-woo points out the inconsistency of her logic, because if she dislikes him thanking people, how does she feel about making him apologize to people? That’s what her actions will cause.

Yoon-ju says that’ll never happen, declaring that her secret will be kept forever, and tells him to bring her the real sachet. Jung-woo’s disappointed, having hoped for better: “You’ve just thrown away your last chance.”

With the princess gone, Gunnie and Seol’s main lady in waiting thumb through a cookbook and sigh over all of Seol’s favorite dishes. The court lady has been growing increasingly flirty with him, and today she instructs Gun to meet her in the garden later for a “creative” night. Ooh la la.

Hae-young arrives at Dan’s hideaway just as she’s leaving, packed bag and all, and sets her straight: Don’t bother going to the airport, because she’s been put on the no-fly list. Oh also? Imma make you pay for everything you have coming to you.

Dan sputters, saying that she ain’t scared of his threats and that she’ll never regret her actions. Her indignation holds for just about three more seconds, because Hae-young informs her that her big payoff isn’t coming, since her funds have been frozen. So if she has plans to live it up abroad with her boatloads of cash, she can cancel them ’cause that boat has sunk. She can forget about her earlier hopes of becoming a lawyer or a judge in Korea, too, because that’s not bloody likely either. And she can say goodbye to ever seeing her mother or Seol again. Nor is she to be in contact with Yoon-ju again.

That does the trick, and Dan is visibly scared. Never, ever cross a diplomat-chaebol-rich-man-angry-boyfriend. You’re just never gonna win.

Hae-young arrives at Mom’s pension as Seol is feeding the dogs, like she’d done on his first visit here. She turns down his request to talk and hurries inside, leaving him to pound on the door, which remains closed.

He speaks through the door anyway, knowing that she’s standing on the other side listening, and says he’s going to be patient, “So let’s not get discouraged.” She doesn’t open up, but she does sit just inside all day long. Hae-young waits outside on the porch all the while, and late that night, he speaks up again:

Hae-young: “When I consider what my father did, and the pain that caused you, I shouldn’t come here. I shouldn’t have come back. I know that’s the only courtesy I can show you, but I’m sorry. I couldn’t do that today. The fun of always finding something to nitpick and bicker with you about — I can’t give that up. And I can’t give up making you feel breathless and making your heart race. I was pampered as a child so I’m not that patient. I’ve never given anything up before. Yes, as you said, I’m a real jerk. You’re right…but…what can I do about missing you?”

His voice breaks at that and he stars to tear up, as does Seol inside. He continues, “What can I do about missing you 24 hours a day? I miss you right now. I miss you to death! What should I do? Lee Seol…I love you. I said, this Mr. P loves you.”

Well, that does the trick.

Seol opens the door and starts to say, “I also…” but he doesn’t give her the chance.

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My Princess Episode 11 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스 / My Princess


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/

My Princess Episode 11 synopsis/summary/recap



Hae-young asks his question, but Seol says she won’t answer: “I know what you gave up for me, I know who you made an enemy of because of me, but how can I answer? If I do, I know things will get even harder, and I don’t know how you’ll be able to protect me. So how can I answer? I won’t.” He gives her a rueful half-smile, saying that he taught her well, seeing how she gives a good answer to a bad question.

(But…we like bad questions! Don’t just let it die here! Ask all the bad questions you want, for the love of fangirls and plot development!)

He pulls her into a hug and says, “Don’t forget this.” Walking by, Yoon-ju the Heartless Android sees the hug. And she’s not only heartless but shameless, since she next lets herself into Jung-woo’s place using his code, preferring to bypass that whole pesky knocking thing. Social niceties are SO passé.

She guesses that Jung-woo has Empress Myung-sung’s sachet, but he refuses to give her the satisfaction of confirming that it’s real. He tells her he’d like for it to be real, but he knows there are those who seek to use history for their own means (*ahem*), which is not so good. Alas, she knows him well enough to read in his reaction that it’s real.

They’ve both considered the possibility that Dan might be supposed to be the princess, but Jung-woo affirms that it won’t happen, while Yoon-ju is more willing to think along those lines.

True to Hae-young’s warning, the president has twisted the orphans’ visit for his own gain, and Seol declares that she’s going to have to study her butt off to make sure that she’s “able to answer bad questions with good answers.”

Hae-young has to deal with the fallout of his behavior in front of the press, which comes in the form of an angry president, who reminds him that he entered the palace to block the restoration. He orders Hae-young to quit the palace, threatening to do some major damage if he doesn’t.

Dan and Yoon-ju have another meeting to discuss their options, now that the sachet is real. Dan declares, “I want what you want,” and Yoon-ju agrees: Starting tonight, Dan will assume the princess role. But when Dan asks about the restoration vote, Yoon-ju laughs — it would be difficult enough to install a real princess, so a fake one’s out of the question. Dan would merely be playing the part, to ensure that the vote never happens. After that, she’ll leave the country.

Dan drops by to scope out her soon-to-be room, though Seol thinks her sister’s here for a friendly visit. Well, maybe just a plain visit, since I’m pretty sure Dan only has two modes: bitch and bitchier. She reads through Seol’s fan mail and makes a snide remark about the orphan who sent it, saying that her own orphan past is something she’d like to hide, though Seol uses hers as a weapon.

Dan leaves her with the cryptic words, “Next time I come to this room, you’d better not be in it.”

Seol spots Hae-young waiting for her and tries to sneak by unseen, as inconspicuous as an elephant in a tutu. Hae-young stops her for a word, which she doesn’t want to hear, thinking he’s going to tell her to forget yesterday. She asks for just one day of reprieve, wanting to spend today away from him to allow herself to come to grips with things.

But no, Hae-young declares that that won’t be possible, as she’s going to be stuck within a 1-meter radius of him all day, and that every time she rebels, he’s going to reduce that space by 50 centimeters. Well, now I know what I’M gonna be hoping for today.

Seol supposes that the reason for his odd (and warm) behavior is that he wants to spend one day with her as herself, rather than as the princess. Too nervous and jumpy to join him, she makes the excuse that Jung-woo is calling her away.

Visiting Sun-ah at the department store, Seol confides her romantic predicament to her friend, who sees that she’s got it bad this time. Seol says that her usual forthrightness won’t work with Mr. P — just as Sun-ah spots him heading their way.

Panicking, Seol insists that he can’t find her here and climbs into a suitcase, urging Sun-ah to cover for her. But Hae-young’s not fooled in the least and politely insists on buying that suitcase, and rolls away with it.

She pokes her head out when he stops, and he sighs that she’s embarrassing. She figures, “Let’s be embarrassed together!” (love her) and reminds him of their 1-meter rule. I do love how shameless she can be.

Again she doesn’t want to hear what he has to say, assuming (wrongly) that it’s something she doesn’t want to hear. Again he forces her to listen, and gives her five instructions: (1) Don’t let anyone hold her hands (he says while holding her hands), (2) Don’t get in anyone’s car, (3) Don’t accept a piggyback ride from anyone, (4) Don’t get drunk with anyone, and (5) Don’t accept anyone’s confession of affection.

That’s as good as a confession itself, and brings a smile to her face. He happens to be talking like a man about to leave for good, but Seol doesn’t pick up on the little hints (and isn’t connecting his behavior or his statements to that plane ticket she’d seen earlier…).

He takes her to the traditional palace where they’d first met, where a new woman sits dressed in traditional princess garb to greet tourists. Seol wants a photo with her, so Hae-young offers to act as the official diplomat for her, “for the first and last time.” He doesn’t realize his slip until she picks up on it, but he glosses the moment over by joking it away.

Seol quickly attracts a crowd, who recognize her and gather round to snap cell phone pics. Seol gives the fake princess a break and offers to take photos with everyone as though it’s a fansigning, and like the budding celebrity she is, the fans quickly line up for their turn. Including Hae-young.

Later, they look over the snapshots from the impromptu event, Hae-young with a wistful expression that Seol doesn’t notice. Growing serious, he tells her in an earnest tone to remember to face her problems head-on in the future and work them out, like a teacher giving his last lesson.

Seol asks why he’s so grave today, to which he answers that he just feels grave today. She senses that something’s up and asks what’s the matter, which he deflects by saying Jung-woo needs to see her, and sends her off.

Clearly that’s not the whole of it, and he grabs hold of her hand for a long, charged moment, trying to hide his emotion, and takes one of the photos for himself.

Jung-woo confers with Seol about her sister and the validity of the sachet. Granted, it won’t be enough to delegitimize Seol’s birth or anything that severe, but he worries that it may cast doubts on her identity, and suggests another trip to the orphanage.

There, the nun clarifies that while Dan said her mother gave her the sachet, it’s not clear whether she meant a biological mother or an imaginary mother, as many of the kids have a tendency to talk of their parents in imaginary terms (e.g., “My mom and dad are really rich”). Dan often spoke of a mother, while Seol spoke of a father and ajusshi — Young Seol had said that if she stayed with ajusshi, Dad would come for her.

This is news to them — who could the other man be? — and they puzzle over the possibilities.

It’s likely she means Hae-young’s father, a photo of whom Hae-young contemplates while packing his bags. He lingers over Seol’s photo, thinking of how quickl the day passed for him, and leaves behind an envelope for Seol to find later.

Upon Seol’s return to the palace, Yoon-ju storms up and confronts her angrily — oh look, the android can simulate emotion — for causing Hae-young to be kicked out of the palace. Hae-young had crossed the president to protect her, and this is his reward.

Shocked, Seol dashes off in search of him. Yoon-ju warns Jung-woo not to hold her back, saying that even if everyone else takes Seol’s side, he shouldn’t — and that everything she’d given Jung-woo up to have is now Seol’s. Well, honey, that’s not her fault, is it? I like to call this little lesson Bad Decisions Have Consequences, Not All Of Which Can Be Blamed On Royalty.

Seol finds Hae-young’s room emptied of his belongings and tries to call him, but his phone goes unanswered. In her room, she finds the envelope containing a document and a note from Hae-young regarding the completion of her first royal decree: He has donated all of her funds (all $140 of it), as instructed.

Now she gives in to her tears, sobbing alone in her room just as Hae-young sends her a text message: “There are two presents.”

Curious, she looks around for the second, not finding anything until her mother calls her name. Hae-young had told her to go comfort her daughter, who’s hurting.

Now it’s time for the men to meet. Hae-young asks Jung-woo to take good care of Seol, which surprises Jung-woo a bit in that it’s something you ask when you have a clear claim on the person in question. In other words: Hae-young is claiming a connection with Seol that he’d previously denied.

With that, Hae-young prepares to head to New York, where he has tracked down his father — who, by the way, has been barred from returning to Korea. Harsh, Grandpa.

Seol is introduced to her new teacher/diplomat, Seung-hyun, and this spurs her into action. Well, she’s not the brightest bulb, but at least she has finally figured things out, and she requests Hae-young’s whereabouts, perhaps guessing that he is, at this moment, awaiting his boarding call at the airport.

She races to the airport, and catches Hae-young as he’s in the line to board his plane. Angry and hurt, she tears into him for trying to leave without telling her properly. She asks hopefully if he’ll return soon, but he’s not sure.

Yoon-ju calls to tell him he owes her another one, because she’d grabbed him in time for him to protect the princess again. An important matter has popped up, requiring Seol and Hae-young to report to the palace. Girl may be counting all the times she’s owed, but why do I suspect that this is not a two-way street with her?

This latest matter relates to the empress’s sachet, and the relevant parties are called for the unveiling. Chairman Park immediately recognizes the artifact, but Seol can’t recall it specifically. Yoon-ju puts on a front of false concern, explaining that she’d been searching for it because its absence could become detrimental to Seol, and now finds herself “thrown into confusion” upon learning who had it.

With that, she introduces the owner and Dan walks in, declaring that it was left to her, the sole remaining possession of her parents. Seol realizes (as do the others) that the implication is that she’s not the princess, and the chairman states that that’s not possible, since he’d left the sachet with Lee Han, Seol’s father.

Assuming a dignified air, Dan says that she had intended to remain quiet to allow Seol to become the princess (so generous!), but now finds she must speak up (and so honorable!).

Thus begins the false story undoubtedly provided by Yoon-ju: That Dan had been left at the orphanage at age 5 because someone had been following her father. One night, he had died, after which point she met Seol at the orphanage — where she told her story to Seol.

Seol bursts out in confusion, knowing this is a lie, but Dan says in her patronizing way that the truth will come out. Oh, we’re counting on it.

Yoon-ju explains that it’ll be problematic to present Seol as the princess without investigation of the matter. The chairman eschews the necessity for further confirmation, but Yoon-ju pulls rank, saying that she considers it her job to investigate all matters thoroughly. And perhaps occasionally invent some?

The chairman asks Dan if she remembers him, and she answers in the affirmative, adding that he’d ridden in on a helicopter the day she’d met him. That’s Seol’s own memory, but slyly, Dan is prepared for this: She asks Seol if she knows why she was at the construction site that day, which Seol doesn’t remember. And since Dan has been coached, naturally she can pass off the truth as her “memory,” saying that the man chasing her father had threatened Dad to never appear in front of the chairman again.

And this, sadly enough, is a memory that even Hae-young can confirm, having been there himself. It’s also enough to introduce substantial doubt that Hae-young avoids looking at Seol. Dan even insinuates that the man chasing her father is Hae-young’s father, which is something Seol doesn’t know.

At this ever-so-convenient juncture, the meeting is interrupted with the announcement of a special news report — handily supplied by Yoon-ju to the pesky Reporter Yoon, of course. Proving that the media is entirely capable of creating news as it is of reporting it, the story states that there is currently heated debate over the true owner of the empress’s sachet, and that Seol’s validity is being investigated.

I’m vastly relieved that Chairman Park is immediately suspicious of this development; he rails to his secretary that there are only a handful of people in the world who know about Hae-young’s father. Secretary Oh cowers nervously, perhaps fearing that the chairman will put two and two together and realize that Yoon-ju might be the one. But the characters in this drama aren’t very good at math, so it’s Hae-young he yells for.

Hae-young confronts Dan, asking how she knows the story. She says firmly that she experienced it firsthand. When asked why she waited to speak, Dan answers that she opposes the restoration. She has no intention of being the princess — she damn well won’t do it for the very people who chased her and her father out into the streets.

Grandpa accuses his grandson of being behind this whole mess, which is a charge that shocks — and hurts. To be sure, it’s not like Grandpa’s SO off the mark since Hae-young had been plotting to derail this princess project from the start, and even tried to whisk Seol abroad, but he’s stunned now.

Grandpa tells him disgustedly that he’s just like his father, and warns that he won’t get his way. Hae-young says bitterly that he’s right, and storms out.

A few more hard words, this time from Yoon-ju to Jung-woo: “I’m hoping for a miracle — that before the people vote on the restoration, Chairman Park collapses.”

Perhaps understanding the emotions driving Yoon-ju, the hurt and fear that exist way, way, way down inside the heartspace in her chest cavity, Jung-woo gathers her into a hug, countering her bitterness with care: “Don’t do it, Yoon-ju. You can stop now.”

She says that she knows, “But I don’t want to.”

Seol stops her sister, who taunts, “Are you scared? Worried? Why? If you’re the real princess, prove it.”

But that’s not her main concern right now, and Seol yells that that’s not the issue — what about what she’s doing to Hae-young?

Yoon-ju steps in to take over this showdown, and mocks Seol by calling hers a tragic Romeo & Juliet situation — just as Hae-young enters.

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My Princess Episode 12 synopsis/recap - 16 Episode Korean Drama 마이 프린세스 / My Princess


Details

* Title: 마이 프린세스 / My Princess
* Genre: Romance
* Episodes: 16
* Broadcast network: MBC
* Broadcast period: 2011-Jan-05 to 2011-Feb-??
* Air time: Wednesday & Thursday 21:55

Synopsis

An ordinary college student, Lee Seol, finds out she's a princess. The grandson of Daehan Group, Park Hae Young, is put in charge of educating Seol on proper etiquette.

Cast

* Song Seung Hun as Park Hae Young
* Kim Tae Hee as Lee Seol
* Park Ye Jin as Oh Yoon Joo
* Ryu Soo Young as Nam Jung Woo
* Lee Soon Jae as President Park Dong Jae
* Maeng Sang Hoon as Oh Ki Taek
* Kang Ye Sol as Lee Dan
* Im Ye Jin as Kim Da Bok
* Lee Ki Kwang as Choi Joon Woo
* Son Sung Yoon as Attendant Shin
* Lee Sung Min as Lee Young Chan
* Lee Dae Yeon as So Sun Woo
* Choi Yoo Hwa (최유화) as Kang Sun Ah
* Heo Tae Hee as Bo Jwa Gwan
* Chu Hun Yub as Yoo Ki Kwang
* Min Joon Hyun as Ki Ja
* Ahn Nae Sang as Emperor Sunjong

Production Credits

* Director: Kwon Suk Jang
* Screenwriter: Kim Eun Sook, Jang Young Shil (장영실)
* Producer:
source: http://wiki.d-addicts.com/

My Princess Episode 12 synopsis/summary/recap



Yoon-ju’s conversation with Jung-woo, where she lays it out for the naïve and trusting professor. He asks if she’s claiming that Dan is the real princess, but she tells him that it doesn’t matter, since what she’s aiming for is the downfall of the monarchy, complete with the Chairman’s collapse.

He’s shocked, as if he’s somehow surprised to find that she’s a heartless bitch. He hugs her, asking her to stop before it goes too far, but she refuses. I sort of hate this reasoning in dramas (always for the second lead) when they admit that they have nothing left to gain, but since they’ve “gone this far,” they have to keep going. I mean, what’s that about? Real people don’t do that. They cut their losses and save themselves.

Seol grabs Dan into her room to ask what she was talking about—not the princess stuff, but about Hae-young’s father. Yoon-ju comes in and tells Dan to go to the apartment she’s prepared, and volunteers to tell Seol everything.

With a condescending air, (not that she has any others, mind you) she tells Seol about Hae-young’s father chasing her own father down, and asks how it feels to be Romeo and Juliet. Seol trembles, tears forming, but Yoon-ju tells her she hasn’t even begun.

She tells her that today’s news was about the satchel, but tomorrow’s news will be about Hae-young’s father. She puts it all out there in a bald-faced threat: drop the princess act and disappear, or else Hae-young never gets to lift his head in Korea again.

Dayum. At least she’s smarter than I thought. For a while Yoon-ju was both bitchy AND ineffectual, but she’s stepping up her game, I’ll give her that much.

Hae-young walks in and clocks the tension between the two women, and asks Yoon-ju what they were talking about. Yoon-ju lies that she was offering words of comfort (pffft), but then Hae-young hilariously doesn’t believe her for even a nanosecond.

He turns to Seol and tells her to trust him: “Just trust me, and tell me what she said to you.” He pleads with her to tell him so that he can protect her, and Seol wavers for a charged minute, while I scream: TELL HIM! TELL HIM!

But she doesn’t, of course. Because Noble Idiocy is the name of the game.

Hae-young decides he has to tell her about his father, but before he can start, Seol stops him: “I already know.” He reels, thinking that she’s already been told about their dads’ past, but then she covers it up by saying that she doesn’t believe anything her sister says, so he shouldn’t either.

She puts on a smile and asks to rest, so he walks out. But the second he’s outside the door, she starts sobbing. Problem is, Hae-young’s still within earshot. Oh no. Here we go with the Big Misunderstanding. Now he thinks she knows about their fathers and is lying because she thinks they really ARE Romeo and Juliet, and can’t face him.

In the morning, Seol comes to confront Yoon-ju, who’s pleased as punch and smug enough not to hide it. Seol calls her out for being evil enough to make her choose between the two most important people in her life, and agrees to leave the palace.

But she adds that this doesn’t mean she’s running away, or giving up the throne. Seol: “I will return. And when I do…you’re dead.” What’s funny is she says it in the schoolyard way, like “you’re totally dead,” which just makes me want to see them in an actual schoolyard brawl. My money’s on scrappy princess.

Yoon-ju just comes back at her with more threats—there’s no way for her to ever come back, because the second she steps foot back in this palace, the whole world will know about Hae-young’s father. She twists the knife further, blaming her for messing up so many people’s lives, including her beloved Hae-young. The only way to make things right is to disappear forever.

Hae-young hesitates, and then decides to call his father in New York. He leaves a message, awkwardly thanking him for the baseball he sent when he was a kid, and asks him to call. He’s heartbreakingly hopeful when he calls his dad.

He goes to see Seol to ask her for the picture of her with her father, so they can go to the press with their side of the story. She worries about what it’ll do to Dan, and tells him that it won’t be enough anyway; that it’ll eventually lead to DNA tests and the exhumation of bodies. Must be the show acknowledging all the “Go CSI on their asses” comments to the royal satchel hullabaloo.

He tells her that they’ll take it all the way then, and gets her to agree to think about it. She asks for the day to rest (or run away forever, what have you) and he gets up to leave. She stops him to ask if he really believes that she’s the princess.

Hae-young: Yes, I believe. Even if the whole world says you aren’t. Until the day I die, to me you’re the bad princess who stole my entire inheritance.

Aw. How cute that he can say “you stole my inheritance” like it’s a term of endearment now.

He tells her to entrust everything to him and leaves, not realizing that this was her goodbye. Seol packs her bag with a heavy heart, ties her hair into a ponytail with her strawberry hairtie, and heads out.

Hae-young heads for Dan, who’s on the phone complaining to Yoon-ju about how bored she is. Oh, is conspiracy boring you, princess? She freaks out when Hae-young comes knocking at her super-secret hideout, and Yoon-ju tells her not to answer the door or the phone, from anyone but her.

Hae-young knocks and finally just talks to her through the door. He tells her that Seol has evidence to prove that she’s the princess, but she refuses to use it, fearing what’ll happen to her sister if she does. Hae-young tells her that Seol is going to shoulder this on her own, and even as Dan scoffs to herself that Seol is playing the good girl, she does appear to be shaken.

He leaves for now, asking her one last question: who is behind this plot? Really, you don’t know? You’re starting to lose my confidence as the fixer here. He asks her to contact him if she changes her mind.

He then heads for Secretary Oh, and asks for proof that Seol is the princess, since he remembers that Grandfather was so sure of her identity, enough to kneel in front of her at first sight. He doesn’t respond, so Hae-young asks if there’s more to his father’s involvement than just pursuing Seol’s father.

Again, no answer, but Secretary Oh implies that Hae-young’s dad is connected deeper than he’d like for Hae-young to know. He decides he’s had enough of other people telling him about his father, and vows to find out straight from the horse’s mouth.

He turns to ask one last thing…does Yoon-ju know all this too? Secretary Oh can’t believe that Hae-young is accusing Yoon-ju of being behind the conspiracy, when they’re family. Hae-young apologizes, but tells him that he can’t trust anyone right now.

He returns to the palace and finds out that Seol took off, so he heads to Mom’s house to look for her there. Well if she went there it wouldn’t really be running away, now, would it? He promises her mother that he’ll take care of Seol.

Meanwhile, Seol is at the police station inquiring after the accident that killed her father. They tell her that incident reports aren’t kept that long (What?) and she hits another dead end. But she remembers something, and heads to her father’s friend the fisherman.

She asks if they remember anything about her and her father being chased, and he does recall that they did leave suddenly in the middle of the night, without a word. Soon after, a well-dressed man in an expensive car came to inquire after them. They add that they called the number in the newspaper ad looking for information on her father a million times, but always got the runaround. It was only through Park Hae-young that they had eventually gotten through to her.

Seol stays the night in Jung-woo’s office, scared and alone. The next day she calls the number herself, and asks the Daehan Group secretary for the list of everyone who called this number with information. She says that almost all of it was useless and refuses to hand it over, but Seol threatens to go straight to the Chairman, which does the job. She spends all day calling everyone on the list, to no avail.

Hae-young broods in his apartment, and decides to call Seol’s friend Sun-ah. She tips him off that it looks like Seol spent the night in the office, but thinks she won’t be back. She promises to call if she returns.

Hae-young makes another call to his father, and this time he pleads with Dad to call him back. He ends up asking if he killed Lee Ahn, and begs for an answer. God, what a question to get on your voicemail.

Seol plods through her list, and finally comes upon a call from the States, from a James Park. She frets over having to use her limited English, then decides that he’s a Park, so he’s probably Korean. She calls, and it’s the same voicemail greeting that Hae-young’s been getting the last two times he’s called his dad. She leaves a message asking for information on her father.

Hae-young calls Yoon-ju over and asks if she knows where Seol is. He says that he’s sorry, but he hasn’t been able to do anything all day, and then it occurred to him that Yoon-ju might have put a tail on Seol, and before he knew it, he was calling her. He tells her he doesn’t care why she had her followed, but to just tell him where she is.

Yoon-ju agrees to tell him, but says that Seol can’t return to the palace, no matter what. Hae-young: “I can’t hear a word you’re saying right now. Where is Seol?” Ooh, I love the urgency. Hot.

He finds her at the coffee shop where she’s just been discovered by a crowd of people, and when he finds her stuck in an altercation over spilt coffee, he just yells at her for being such a mess without him for one day. Oh, all about YOU, is it?

In the car, he asks if she’s going to run away again, and she says that until she can find out about her father’s past, she’s not going back. Hae-young: “Do you really think that my father and your father…” She doesn’t answer, but asks him if he believes in his dad.

He says it’s his only hope right now, and tells her that they’ll find out the truth together from now on. Well thank goodness for that. Not much more broody separation I can take.

And then he takes her to…Jung-woo’s house? Well that’s a surprise. Or are they staying there…together? Oh, hells yeah. Why didn’t this happen sooner?

Yoon-ju gets word that the threesome is shacking up at Jung-woo’s house, but she doesn’t have the same reaction as me. Hm. She then gets yelled at by Grandpa for letting Seol disappear under her watch, and her father realizes that she’s more involved than he thought.

At the palace, Team Seol hunkers down for an afternoon of internet damage control. Cute.

Back at Three’s Company Bungalow, Hae-young starts opening refrigerator doors like he owns the place, and drags Jung-woo out to let Seol wash up in privacy. At the store, he buys steaks for dinner, adding for Jung-woo’s benefit that it’s the cut that Seol likes, and he likes what the princess likes.

Jung-woo actually rolls his eyes at Hae-young’s childishness, but that doesn’t mean he’s above it all, and picks an expensive cut for himself, since Hae-young is buying. They return home to find Seol asleep on the couch, and Hae-young snipes that Jung-woo should own a larger couch so she didn’t have to scrunch like that.

He starts to ask for a blanket but Jung-woo’s on top of it, and when he tenderly covers her with the blanket, Hae-young tells him to just place the blanket, minus all that unnecessary touching. HA.

Jung-woo asks why on earth he came here, and Hae-young says it’s because he didn’t think Yoon-ju would come here, even if she knew where they were. Jung-woo tells him that he doesn’t know Yoon-ju very well, and the way he sees it, she’ll just end up getting hurt one more time because of Hae-young.

He then tells Seol she can get up now, since they’re done talking. Seol opens her eyes sheepishly, and asks how he knew. Jung-woo’s familiar with what she looks like when she’s really dozing off, and tells her that he brought home dinner. Hae-young: “I’m the one who paid for it, and you’re taking all the credit.”

The doorbell rings, and Jung-woo guesses that it’s Yoon-ju. Sure enough, she comes in and asks to speak to Seol alone.

Yoon-ju scoffs, “This is where you ran off to?” Seol: “It must make you jealous, that I’m with both the men you refused to let go of.” Nice. Yoon-ju tells her to shut up, but Seol doesn’t back down: “This must be your true face. Let’s be friendlier. So I can see all your sides.”

Yoon-ju tells her to go see Grandpa and tell him that she won’t be the princess anymore. Seol asks what her proof is that Hae-young’s father killed her own. She tells Seol to go see the Chairman, who will give her the proof she needs, since he knows how it all went down.

Hae-young interrupts them and takes Seol by the hand. Yoon-ju tells him to let go, by the Chairman’s orders, but Hae-young tells her to blame it on him—that he took Seol away, and then he does.

He tells her not to meet Yoon-ju anymore, especially alone. Yes, thank you. She asks where they’re going, and he says where doesn’t matter, as long as nobody knows…since they’re going somewhere alone, just the two of them. Rawr?

Hae-young: I wasn’t going to do this because your heart is in hell and I didn’t want to just make myself happy, but…I’m just going to be the bad guy.

As in: Being alone with you makes me inappropriately happy in your time of crisis, but to hell with it, I’m gonna drag you away to a secluded spot and just be happy. As in: Swoon.

They pull up to a house in the countryside, and when Seol walks up, she has a memory of Hae-young’s father, coming to greet her at the door.

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